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2017 – A Year in Review

Well, another year has gone by and we have had some milestones happen. This has been a good year for us, so, in an effort to recap what has been happening, let’s look back at last years review. (Make sure to scroll down and check out all of the articles. Also, write a comment on your favorite article, or articles.)


You can click here to see last years review.

Disclaimer: Customs N Classics does not charge for any articles. These are free and are derived from emails, chat messages and other forms of communication. The details are from the owner/trustee and are not physically verified. Should there be any issues with this story, please let us know, privately and we will do our best to correct any mistakes.
If you enjoy Customs N Classics articles, please consider a donation to help us with the costs associated in running this site.

As for this year, well, let’s just say it started a little slow. January through April, we had a total of 1,019 views to our site. Four months and we barely had any viewership, which made me wonder if this was at all worth it.

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Hot Rod Fuel Hose – The Company

Recently, I found out that there is this small start up company that was making a product based on real needs of the Hot Rod community. (Actually, I won a free Sticker and that led me to their story.)

These guys had found a need, based on their own issues in building a project and decided that it would be a great idea to make a product that was superior. Below, you can read their story and see why they did it, for yourself.


Customs N Classics does not support one product over the other, rather, strives to share the stories of those in the automotive world for others to read and make informed decisions.
While we may write a feature, or review a part or tool, it is in no way to be interpreted that we feel one is better or more deserving than another, unless we specifically state it. With that in mind, please enjoy the following article, as it is derived from what they have already written on their web site.
If you enjoy Customs N Classics articles, please consider a donation to help us with the costs associated in running this site.

This is their story, who they are and why they feel they will succeed.

So, Justin Gorzitza, tell me a bit about yourself, why you started this.

editing_1345_1_824d1d4f-ed92-48a1-8f33-4ed463421b2c_360x

Check them out at hotrodfuelhose.com

High school was when I first inherited my dad’s 1980 Chevy C10, boy did I ever have big plans for this thing. At 15 when I started working on this puppy I wanted it to have the best of everything and spent way too much money to try and make that happen. I also had no clue what the hell I was doing and a lack of confidence in how to make it happen. I took a lot of stuff apart including the engine, transmission, and the rest of the drive train. Spent too much money at the speed shop and then didn’t know how to get the thing back together again.

It Sat and Sat and Sat, I got married, had a Son, and It followed me as I moved multiple times but never really got the time or the desire to get back onto this project until 2015 when I finally got serious again. My desires changed at this time and I thought it would be really impressive to rebuild this back to a stock look and still be a reliable driver. You can check out my build thread on 67-72chevytrucks.com The idea was to impress my dad with this truck that looks just like when he bought it.

1980 C10 by Hot Rod fuel hose

So, what made you get into fuel hoses and lines? Why would that even be an issue?

I had been reading lot’s on fuel injection over the years and considered installing a Mega Squirt at one time and converting some type of other injection system to my 383 stroker that I had built, but was always turned off by how much work would have needed to go into learning how the mega squirt and fuel injection system worked.

The year I started back seriously on finishing this project a company called FiTech released an affordable fuel injection system and it had great reviews and was gaining a following of automotive enthusiasts. So I gave it a shot and ordered one up.

I went down to the local speed shop and was seeking out ways to install my fuel system –

IMG_20170913_102637_e8ca6b90-ba1e-420e-a382-19e48966f6c5_1024x1024@2x

A sample of their fuel line and connections

Well, they want almost as much cash for the rubber stainless steel braided line as I paid for my EFI FiTech system. That’s not right! I thought I could do better than that, my gut told me so.

I reached out to a ton of manufacturers and ordered samples, tested the product, and negotiated like crazy.

Once I had a product I believed in, at a price I felt is better suited to people like me, we ordered some. A LOT of hose and A LOT of fittings – probably too much but we believed so strongly that there is an opportunity for a High Quality PTFE braided hose in the market with awesome looking AN fittings that we committed to taking the idea forward.


A side note, so everyone is up on the terms and what the products are.

What is PTFE hose and what is it used for?

PTFE is a specific chemical composition commonly referred to as Teflon. We chose to only offer PTFE lined AN braided hoses due to better chemical resistance with common automotive fluids and specifically the higher ethanol content gasoline that is offered today.

It is most commonly used for fuel lines and transmission cooler lines. Many guys use it for LS swaps, EFI installations, and good old reliable carbs. Typically fitting adapters are needed to convert to an AN style fitting.

What are the fittings made from?

Our PTFE hose end fittings are made from 6061 Aluminum alloy and anodized to give it a sharp look. We also engrave our logo to really make them pop.


IMG_20171023_180547_b87114bc-2c13-4b1c-a2db-a52971004bf7_1024x1024@2x

A close up look at a fitting with their logo.

Ok, so, you have your fittings, you have your hoses, what’s next?

Well, we are still a new business selling PTFE hose for Hot Rods so we want to do a great job at getting our name out. Sales so far have been very strong and in fact above expectations. We have had to order new product already thanks to support from our Awesome customers and we look forward to becoming a premier supplier of Hot Rod fuel hose and AN Fittings and continuing to search out new opportunities for finding quality products at great prices so we can all continue to enjoy this hobby we have (and that our wives definitely don’t like) and I hope you will all support us and let your friends and hot rodding buddies know we exist as that has definitely been the biggest challenge in this venture so far.

This is a new company with some great reviews already. (Check out their reviews!)

Want to contact them? Check it out!

Email us at info@hotrodfuelhose.com

Contact us on FACEBOOK

Call US (866) 797-0384.

Let them know you saw them here. We don’t get anything from it, but, it would help them to know that they are out there.


Customs N Classics store – Amazon Store showcasing some tools, some models, some “vintage” metal signs and some automotive books

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2017 Apple Scrapple Festival Car Show – Bridgeville, DE

On Saturday, October 14th, my family and I decided to attend the 2017 Apple Scrapple Festival Car Show in Bridgeville Delaware.

This year marked the 26th annual festival in this little town. We have been going on and off for the last 17 years we have been married, but, my wife has been going longer that that, as she has lived on the Eastern Shore of Maryland longer that I have.

Now, as you can guess, this festival is centered around apples and scrapple. (For those of you who may not know what scrapple is, it is scraps of pork, seasoned and cooked and put in a mold.)

The festival is a Friday evening and Saturday event that includes vendors of every kind and plenty of food vendors, with an emphasis on apple foods and scrapple sandwiches. (Again, if you really want to know what scrapple is and my explanation just isn’t enough, ask google.)

Now, this event also hosts a decent sized car show, which is what I will be sharing with you in this article.

You can see the videos, basically, 3 videos that I edited from one large video. This is just a quick walk-through of the show, to give you and idea of the size. I am also adding all of the photos, so you can see some of the best ones there. (All of the cars/trucks were very good, but, I only had so much time.)

Video Part 1

Video Part 2

Video Part 3


Here are the pictures for you to go through.


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1968 Camaro – Jimmy Johnson

OK, so, a couple of weeks ago, we showcased Jimmy Johnson and the 1956 Chevy truck he built. We also shared that it would be making it’s debut at the Goodguys Autocross event.1956 Chevy Banner

This has been one of the most popular interviews to date, so, I thought, heck, why not showcase more? You seem to really like his builds, so, let’s take a look at this one.

This 68 Camaro is designed and custom built by Jim Johnson of Jim’s Body & Paint in Geneva ,Iowa.

What is the year, make and model of this one?

uptwn 002This is a 1968 Chevy Camaro

Who is the owner of the Camaro and is it still theirs?

It belongs to Donny Warneke. Donny got the car in 1985 and drove it throughout High School.

Was this a father/son, Daughter project?

No, however, Donny and my boy, Travis, ran together. Picture 460 (Large)

Travis had a 71 Chevelle at the time. They were two of the local gear heads, who, together built,raced, swapped, and grenaded more than a few engines, as well as,  scattered many other parts across the countryside.

I helped put the Camaro back together after a couple of out of control ditch rides.

I guess, in a way, that explains why you built this vehicle, but, can you give us some background for it?

Picture 173 (Medium)Along the way the 68 got pushed, motor less, into the barn for a long rest.

In 2003 it was drug into my shop again, this time for a nice restoration. It had been beat to death and needed it all.

So, I asked the question, why restore at this stage? Let’s just build.

It went Dec. 27, 2007 to Recovery Room Hot Rod Interiors for a one off Custom treatment by Tracy Weaver and Crew.14066377_1502249496467843_861187962101804935_o

So, with all it needed, can you let us know what you did to it, what parts were used, what fabrication needed done?

The engine was built by Donny and Travis.

It is a fully balanced and blue-printed 440 cubic inch GM Big Block with Heads that are 1967 GM Aluminum, small Chamber Rect. Prt. 2.19 intake 1.88 exhaust, with 10.5 compression. It has all aluminum accessories and pulleys.

100_1561 - CopyIt has a Solid Roller Cam .620 lift with a Single plane intake & 830 cfm. Carburetor.

Ceramic short style Headers for ground clearance and Custom Stainless with Torquetube exhaust.

March Long Pump serpentine belt and pulley system and a Large crossflow Aluminum Radiator with Dual Fans to allow it to handle 650 HP.

The Modifications to the underside and drive-train include:

The Drive train is a 6 Speed Transmission, which was adapted from a 2005 dodge Viper,  with a  new, heavy duty clutch system converted to a Hydraulic Clutch. A 12 Bolt. Rear/4.10 Posi-traction,  GM Standard four wheel Disc Brakes  ,all Stainless lines, Quick Picture 471ratio GM Power Steering, 2 inch drop spindles, Coil-overs, Tubular A arms, 1inch sway bar, a relocated and dropped rear Leaf spring, Heavy shocks and Z’D shackles.

The rear suspension is heavily modified. Wheel tubs moved inboard 2″ (2 inches), the shocks were relocated, the springs were lowered and moved inboard, traction bars were installed, disk brakes added, new bearings, seals, fuel tank and lines and a new fuel pump.

The battery was relocated to the rear.

All of the lines are new and are stainless steel and the fasteners and hardware are also new, throughout.

Picture 089 - CopyIt rolls on Billet Specialties Wheels, 18X8 front 18×9.5 Rear with Z-rated Good Year tires good for 200 MPH plus.

The front bumper is a 1969, which was narrowed and reshaped, painted and mounted with fabricated brackets.

The upper grill opening is smoothed and recessed to accommodate quad (4) headlights from a 1970 Oldsmobile and is also hand fabricated stainless steel grill, the turn signals and driving lights were adapted from a 1969 Camaro. The lower valance had the lower grill opening fabricated.

The front fenders have lower extensions molded ahead and behind the wheel. The lower air dam and fender extensions are one-off, made of molded fiberglass.

The hood has a steel cowl induction scoop welded in from the bottom side and molded smooth all around.

All inner front panels and support systems were smoothed, relocated and modified, then painted body colors.11033716_1114030025289794_96223014952019809_o

Side rocker panels were extended the full length to give an even and finished look to the bottom edges, then the rear quarters were smoothed, side lights removed and ends of the rear spoiler were molded on.

The rear deck lid has the original spoiler reshaped and molded to it.

The rear body panel has lamps fabricated in from a 1969 Camaro and reversed. The gas cap is a custom pop-up welded in.

100_1760 (Large) - CopyThe doors are smoothed and a 2003 GM latch and handle system was installed and molded.

All painted surfaces are finished with P.P.G. base coat/clear coat system in super red and silver pearl.

Other modifications include new instruments, altered oil pan, steering linkage, transmission mount and tunnel, emergency brake moved from the foot to the hand, new pedals and a steering wheel.

So, Jimmie took what would have been possibly a minor restoration/project and completely remade this Camaro. Check out all of the pictures below and let Jimmie know what you think of this Camaro.

 

Jimmy Johnson – 1956 Chevy Pickup 3200

What do you get when you add a person with their own garage, tools and

1

talents, truck parts in the back yard just waiting for something to happen, a model, chop

ped up and built and an imagination?

Well, keep reading and find out!

18209050_1891319540894168_6066131479989811535_oJimmy Johnson lives in North Central Iowa and has been doing these builds since 1965. You can see his work via his

Facebook page. He has quite a collection of builds, which hopefully, we will be able to showcase here in the future.

Let’s just jump right in and see what you get when you mix it all together.

Let’s just start simple. What is the Make, Model and Year of your truck?
13320398_1409661069060020_6146959851760240641_o

This is two vehicles put together. The body is a 1956 Chevy Pickup 3200 and the chassis is a 1987 Corvette frame.
So, with that information, it makes one wonder, what engine/transmission are you running in it?
It has a small block Chevy Engine, 383 CI, High Compression, Roller cam with a 850cfm Holley carburetor.
It was dyno tested to 649 HP.
18922920_1947139641978824_7310756913303858657_oIt also has a Borg Warner Super T10 transmission with a 410 posi. rear-end.
How is your running gear/ suspension/steering and brakes set up?
I converted it to Coil overs on all for corners, with heavier sway bars front and rear, I put on 14 in. 6 piston Baer Brakes, This all sits on a 1987 C4 Corvette chassis, with Billet Specialties Rims 12 X 18 in. on all four corners.
So, you put your truck on a better frame? Or just made the better chassis for the 17157631_1813717915320998_1648495139294827240_otruck frame?
I used a complete C4 chassis and made the truck parts fit on it.
So, what did you have to do to make them fit?
I cut and rearranged every piece, Chopped the top 6in, sectioned 12 in. channeled over the Corvette rails, shortened the box 2 feet and lengthened the front fenders 6in.
Also, I flipped and reversed the stock windshield , molded the rear fenders to the cab for a Uni-body structure.
You have done a lot of work, a lot of custom fabrication, so, I have to ask, why this truck, why this build?
12983206_1368072196552241_6944101686224167787_oThis is my favorite 50’s pickup body style.
Also, I had the parts just sitting in my back yard for years.
We had a brainstorm one day and got a tape measure out and started measuring things, did up some sketches and cut up a scale model to see if I liked it. Showed it to a client and he liked the idea.
You said you chopped and built a scale model? Who did the model and do you still have it?
I did the model and yes, I still have it.
The model has a longer box is the only difference.
When did you start this build and how long did it take?
I started November 2015 and am just now finishing it for it first show this weekend. (July 1st, 2017)
It took 18 months start to finish.
I did all the modifications, assembly and paint. Had a mechanic friend help with the 18192631_1889147657778023_1608639188553462599_omechanical assembly.
18 months is a new record for me building a ground up project. next closest is 4 years.
Any specific help, i.e., Parts stores, friends,shops, etc, that helped the build, so we can link to them in the article?
PPG paint
Auto Parts Plus, Hampton Ia.
Ron Lukes Engines, Mason City Ia.
Randy Boelman, Mechanic
Don Warneke, owner.
13301233_1409560889070038_5348203110474121756_oAnything else?
We intend to enter in the Good Guys Auto Cross Event this weekend. I will be getting some outdoor pics this weekend and maybe some video on and off the track.

Now, the rest of the story

Jimmy and tJimmy Johnson 1956 Chevy 3he owner, Don Warneke, took the truck to the Good Guys Auto Cross Event over the weekend. (June 30 – July 2, 2017). Below is his account of what happened.

We arrived on  Friday morning and went straight to the Autocross track. Jimmy Johnson 1956 Chevy 18

Don spun the car at the finish line on his 3rd run. We went and had the car scaled and saw we needed to make a few adjustments. The car handled better after that. His fastest lap was 52 seconds.

Jimmy Johnson 1956 Chevy 4On Saturday Al Unser Jr. went for a ride in the 56 for a lap and gave us some more tips on things we could work on to go faster.

For the last time out, Robin Hetchler did an in car video for Rat Rod Magazine.

Jimmy Johnson 1956 Chevy 8He didn’t quite qualify for the final 16 car shoot out, of 12 Pro cars and only 4 others. However, as we were getting ready to pack up and leave, a GOODGUYS judge showed up and gave the car a Wild Card Award, “JUST BECAUSE IT’S NEAT”.

We cleanJimmy Johnson 1956 Chevy 1ed the 56 up a little and moved it to The Winner’s Circle parking lot and came again on Sunday to join the Winners Parade to pick up the Award. Everyone loved the little truck and tons of photos were taken and many interviews were given.

 

Big shout-out to Ed Siems of Ed’s Photography for the photos he took at the Goodguys event.

Take some time to browse through the entire photo collection to see the parts fabricated, how the brakes look, how the engine looks, what took place behind the scenes and how it looks now. Photos of the Goodguys event are also included, as well as photos by Ed’s Photography! Make sure to leave a comment telling us what you think.

Why do we do this?

20170518_195229The video of why we do this.

I honestly started it to make money, thinking that anything about cars should grow quickly and become profitable.

Fast forCustoms n classics logoward about 3 weeks, I realized that I didn’t care if it made money or not, I enjoyed talking with people, especially about their cars. All I had to do was figure out what direction I wanted to go in.

My son, Aaron, became integral. He is my oldest and I saw this as a great way to connect with him, to grow a relationship with him, more that that of a father/son, but, also that of a friend. He goes with me to events and is fast becoming my cameraman.cross_full_full

Then, I realized that I wanted to integrate my faith into this, to have that avenue to share, to pray for people and to be an encouragement to those who are down. Customs N Classics became a ministry.

Now, I can honestly say, I do this because I really want people to get a sense of what goes into these creations, whether it is bought, or built. What stories lie behind the purchase or the build. I want the viewers to feel like they have connected with the owners.

Secondly, I want to share the hope I have with others. I want people to know that there is a better life coming, for those who choose Jesus Christ. I also want to be there to encourage those who need it and to be there to pray for people. Check out the video.

See the entire video