Ocean City Cruise week – 2017

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Ok, so, we tried something a little different. We got some new equipment and decided to do a video blog about our trip to Cruise week.20170518_183700

See the Video Blog Here.

We decided to go down, on Thursday, May 18, 2017. We went down for the afternoon, thinking, (My first mistake), that we could use the daylight to park and talk with owners, then hit the vendors in the evening.

20170518_195250Unfortunately, in OC, trying to do a video interview is almost impossible, but, we did get 4 of them from the Ocean City Cruisers, prior to actually getting to the show.

We tried to make it like a trip, so, you could see what we saw, but, you have to remember, we are not paid professionals, we do this because we enjoy it, so, no critiquing my skills. lol.20170518_200253

 

 

 

 

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Gavin Smith – Aftermath – Custom Motorcycle

motorcycle crash

This is not a picture of the actual crash, but, a photo pulled off Google

We’ve all heard about motorcycle accidents. The guy/gal gets creamed at an intersection, or a guy backing up runs into the bike. Stories like these are horrible and can often lead to a devastating accident that leaves the rider disabled or dead. We rarely, if ever, hear of anything good that comes out of an accident, but, this time, something did.

 

This article is about Gavin Smith’s first custom bike, which he named “Aftermath”, which you will soon learn why. I have written this as though he were telling the story, so, sit back and enjoy.

18471963_1796287413731469_576964059_oAftermath: It was my first road bike I’ve ever owned. A 1993 Yamaha Virago 750 with 12k miles. I bought it for $1850 and I rode that bike everywhere putting 12k more on it the first summer I had it.
I drove it for a few years until I was in an accident. I was hit by a semi truck that merged on top of me. Long story short I was hurt but alive and my bike was totaled.
I actually rode the bike home from the accident, but it was in rough shape. The insurance 18406031_1796291017064442_2067553222_ocompany offered to let me buy the bike back for $75.
I knew the motor was still good so I said for $75 I’ll take it.
I wanted to build something, but wasn’t sure what. I could do a go cart, v twin quad, bobber. All kinds of ideas went through my head.
I finally decided to build a bobber. (See the Bullet Bobber, Here)
Note from Customs N Classics: Because I am not as educated on Bike terms, as I might be on car/truck terms, I felt it necessary to find out what was meant by the term, bobber. I did go to Wikipedia, (GASP, I know, but the sources for the information were pretty top notch), and copied their definition, so, anyone who is in my shoes would have an idea what the term meant.
(According to Wikipedia, the definition of a bobber is as follows; A bobber, originally called a ‘bob-job’ from the 1930s through 1990s, is a style of custom motorcycle. The typical construction includes stripping excess bodywork from a motorcycle; removing the front fender, and shortening the rear fender, which is “bobbed” (as in bob-tail), and all superfluous parts removed to reduce weight.)
18405714_1796291547064389_2115423042_oI took down the bike to the frame and removed all the damaged and broken parts off the bike. Surprisingly the frame was unharmed with the exception of the back half that supports the passenger.
I cut the back portion off and reinforced the frame where I cut the back off.
I made a list of parts and went to Bills Bone Yard, in Salt Lake City, UT,
After picking through a bunch of parts I had everything on my list but lights.
I found a pretty cool old Kawasaki tank and some handle bars from a bullet bike that attach to the fork tubes. I got all the replacement lights and a new Springer seat from eBay. 18426819_1796291463731064_1558938355_o
The build was quite easy actually. I just had to make new mounts for the seat, tank and headlight. I loosened the tree around the forks and slid the forks up 3 inches so I could attach the sport bike style handle bars. That lowered the bike and gave it a new aggressive looking stance.
I made some new side covers out of diamond page aluminum. And I made a new set of exhaust for it and was back riding again after a fresh paint job. I only spent 600$ total in parts and paint.
18426517_1796291703731040_947382096_oIt turned out really cool. I didn’t go to a gas station without someone commenting on it, or asking “what kind of bike is that?!” I eventually sold it but still to this day there are times I wish I still had it.

You can see Gavins other Bobber, the Bullet Bobber, here.

You can see gavins Rat Rod, here.

men don’t make cars (like they used to)

Another automotive geared poem.

kickstartyourheart

1526_56b9cb2eda7556.76870732-big

Men don’t make cars like they used to do:

long sweeping lines, strong colours too:

such poetic palettes, rich array of hues.

Horns happily honked, grilles that grinned,

mudguard covered spoke wheels spinned,

engines growled – wondrous whirlwind!


Dial displays, walnut wood dashboards,

large leather seats with room to afford

– classic cars never leave you bored!


Our Sixties saloon six-cylinder growled,

brown Triumph 2000 like tiger prowled,

acceleration fast, Morris Minors scowled.


One day my dad bought an MG sports,

male madness, mid-life crisis of sorts;

famously, we five fitted in, of course!


My parents in hand stitched leather seats,

I bent in footwell, near mother’s feet,

boot and bench filled, family complete.


More modest cars purchased on divorce,

gone the grand engines, farewell torque

– replaced by brands of ill-report…

_______________________________
image: Alan Fearnley
http://www.alanfearnleystudio.com/#!biography/c10fk

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Old abandoned cars

Pretty good poetry, love the fact it is geared towards those who love cars. Elegance brought to the rusty edge of a love affair with metal.

kickstartyourheart

Beached Oldsmobile by Darren Hunt @DHunt78  www.artfinder.com/darren-hunt

oldsmobile

Old abandoned cars show some neglect:

rust-scabbed paintwork cracks and peels;

crumbling tyres no longer cinema-squeal

but – Detroit-dinosaurs still evoke respect.

Cracked windows reveal dusty seat sheen,

body shapes sing, fenders refuse to gleam

fifties fashionable (lost American dream)

Hollywood hope once portrayed on screens.

Passionate V8 engines grumble-purring,

long leather bench-seats slippery, ample,

black-top and prairie-landscape samples,

hubcaps reflect highway wheels whirring.

Rose-tint reminiscent, American auto past,

restless travel, Kerouac-beat escapades,

milkshakes and hamburgers freshly made:

rearview dollar dreams fade far too fast.

Will passionate mechanics tool-grip plugs

and spark resting engines into ignition?

Will many men go on mechanical mission?

When do driving dreams become a drug?

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Gavin Smith – Bullet Bobber – Custom Motorcycle

As I was writing the article for Gavin Smith’s ’47 Ford Rat Rod, He told me about his other current project, his custom motorcycle. The “Bullet Bobber”. Below is the story, as he relayed it to me.18362529_1790373904322820_1981704360_o

The bike started out as a titled roller hard tail frame that I picked up from a guy for $250.

600 Ninja

Tried an engine from a 600 Ninja

I tried to fit a couple of different motor ideas from bikes people were parting out. I tried a 600 ninja motor first that fit perfect but had too many electrical problems so that idea was abandoned.

My next attempt was going to use a 600 savage single cylinder, but parts were far and few between, so that idea was scrapped. 18362351_1790374100989467_1140424742_o

It had been sitting for two years and I was moving so I was just going to scrap the idea all together. I decided to check one last time on my local classified website and came across a 96

96 suzuki 600

Finally used an engine from a 96 Suzuki Bandit 600

Suzuki bandit 600. The guy got a bad deal and was selling it cheap because he couldn’t get the title. I picked it up running but needing a clutch for $500.

The Suzuki 600 was much bigger than the ninja 600 18338853_1790372510989626_347782111_oand wouldn’t fit in the frame. I decided to use the rear swing arm from the bandit but had to custom build my own frame around the motor.

18339478_1790372447656299_341464515_oI did all the fabrication work and tube bending with a hydraulic pipe bender from Harbor Freight and did the notching with a cutoff disk and grinder.

I took my time and made sure everything was symmetrical and straight on the frame. I used all the Suzuki original wiring but had no place to hide it. It took me a few days to come up with the idea to use an ammo can to house the battery and wiring. 18361903_1790372590989618_2018628245_o

I spent a lot of time on eBay looking for parts that would look good on the bike.

I had to move the foot controls forward with a universal forward foot control linkage kit I found on eBay along with the headlights and blinkers.

18426810_1796269980399879_438543554_oI had Birdmans Custom Seats make a custom seat with our family brand incorporated into the design on the seat.

I custom made the exhaust from the header back with 18318583_1790372037656340_784461673_oexhaust parts from Auto Zone and replaced the stock air box with pod filters from, you guessed it, eBay.

It took some re jetting to get the carbs tuned in but all in all it was a super fun bike build. Probably the coolest most unique bike i have ever build.

18338849_1790372170989660_1771853452_oAt the time I originally wrote this article, Gavin was waiting on a custom seat. Well, it came in and he installed it. There are new picks in the below collage. I am also embedding a video of him finally getting to ride it.

Gavin has another bike that I am just waiting on the story and pictures. That bike was named 18405624_1796270027066541_853464828_oAftermath, which, once you hear the story, you understand the name.

(You can see the story, here)

Here are the current photos of the build, as soon as he gets the final parts in the mail and on the bike, we will update the pictures so you can see the final masterpiece.

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